How to install Phalcon PHP on XAMPP on linux

I've search all over the web, but wasn't able to find any sort of instruction for installing Phalcon PHP on XAMPP on linux. How is it possible to be down?

edited Oct '17

Why would you want to use XAMPP on Linux? That will only get you problems. It's far better idea to install app server (PHP-FPM) and web server (nginx) on your own (i.e. from repository) and then compile Phalcon on top, or even use official Packagecloud repository so you don't even need to compile Phalcon.

edited Oct '17

Why would you want to use XAMPP on Linux? That will only get you problems. It's far better idea to install app server (PHP-FPM) and web server (nginx) on your own (i.e. from repository) and then compile Phalcon on top, or even use official Packagecloud repository so you don't even need to compile Phalcon.

Thanks for your answer. I want to setup a workstation on my laptop that has linux Mint 18.1 OS, but instaling apache web server increases its boot time to 3 mins. I want to remove apache2 package and use XAMPP instead. Also Nginx wont work for me becaouse I depend on .htaccess files in my rest api projects.

edited Oct '17

Well, that's a mess.

XAMPP is nothing but a stack consisting of Apache, MySQL and PHP for WINDOWS. If Apache increases your boot-time (huh!?), then XAMPP wont work either. Your best bet would be to debug apache2. Maybe you already have an http server sitting on port 80, thus apache times out?

Or use nginx. Apache was great 10 years ago. https://winginx.com/en/htaccess

edited Oct '17

:S I hear this quite often. Many developers are having trouble to get things up and running. Only worse I've seen is in nodejs world, folks are pretty clueless about how things work together.

It is very likely that your apache waits to resolve hostname (FQDN) on startup - so adding static DNS entry in your either DNS or local /etc/hosts will help with that. But I'm not sure if that's your only issue though. Using nginx is lightweight. You depend on htaccess rules? Well, that's not very good idea. If you really concieve your apps that way - then you can convert to nginx rules. I've done that for one project -and actually it was much simpler, clearer and straight then a shitload of .htaccess rules people tend to put in their apps.

Tip: add in /etc/apache2/apache2.conf line like this: ServerName your.fqdn.here and match it to resolvable fqdn you've used on your local DNS or your /etc/hosts file.